marketing best practices

The internet is the information hub of the world. Every day, millions of people are surfing the net to find love, catch up with old friends and most importantly, buy products and services. Businesses seeking to keep up have moved most of their major functions online. However, optimizing websites for desktop-viewing is not the only hurdle companies face.

Mobile-ready emails, responsive websites and mobile apps top the list of mobile marketing best practices. 

More than ever, people are surfing the net on their phones. The introduction of the smartphone has changed the way people get information. From checking their emails to updating their Facebook statuses, smartphones and tablets have let people take the internet on-the-go. Smart businesses have bridged the gap by creating mobile sites and apps. There are a million ways to become a more mobile-friendly company. However, mobile-ready emails, responsive websites and mobile apps top the list of mobile marketing best practices. Committing to mobile marketing best practices will determine the success of your company online. 

Make Sure Your Emails Are Readable On Mobile 

Any company that collects emails should be mobile-friendly. Companies typically collect customers’ emails when they sign-up for a newsletter, order a product or request a service. Because email collection is tied so much into ordering products, it is crucial that emails render well on mobile. Customers should be able to read order and account information sent via email. If the email isn’t readable on mobile, it can impact everything from billing and ordering to shipping and delivery.

Poor mobile rendering can result in poor customer service, bad reviews, and loss of old and new customers.

This is more than just a possibility. Fifty-one percent of consumers most often check their email on a smartphone or tablet. If an email is not readable, 80 percent of people will delete it. These snap deletions can lead to loss of vital information. In email marketing campaigns, 30 percent of customers will unsubscribe from future emails if just one message does not read well on mobile.

Mobile-ready emails means short headers, large text, and buttons with plenty of finger-tapping room in a single column layout. 

But what does it mean to have mobile-ready emails? It involves short headers, large text, and buttons—with plenty of finger-tapping room—and a single column layout. It also means making sure that every link in the email has a mobile-friendly destination. These simple measures will make sure customers have a smooth experience navigating from the email to the main site.

Your Website Design Should Be Responsive 

I own a Samsung Grand Prime. On the cheaper end of the spectrum, the phone costs under 100 dollars, is lightweight and manages to do most of the same functions as any other smartphone. What does this have to do with mobile marketing best practices? Everything.

People are using Android phones, iPads, and everything in between, to get on the net. No matter what they use, even if the site looks a little different on each device, it should still look great. 

While most websites appear mobile-ready on my device, what about everyone else’s? People are using Android phones, iPads, and everything in between, to go online. No matter what they use, even if the site looks a little different on each device, it should still look great. This flexibility is called website responsiveness. Your website should adjust automatically to the user’s device. If users cannot get on a site from their device, they may not revisit the site.

Google sends mobile searchers to websites that are responsive, meaning if your site is not mobile-friendly, it is unlikely to show up in Google’s mobile listings. 

Since the majority of searches are made on mobile, a company can render themselves invisible to searchers by not having a responsive website. Companies can maximize their organic mobile search traffic by optimizing their site for multiple devices.

Hold Off on Creating an App

Some companies opt to create an app for their mobile users. But, unless your company has a compelling reason for customers to download and reuse an app, you shouldn’t bother. The vast majority of downloaded apps are promptly abandoned. One reason for this could be the phenomenon called cellphone bloat.

If all or most functions can be performed just as quickly on a mobile-site, adding an app is a waste of time and money. 

Cellphone bloat happens when a device slows down or acts up due to background activity. Many cellphone users fix this issue by deleting apps from their phones. If a user cannot find a compelling reason to keep an app, it usually gets tossed. Companies interested in app development may be wasting their money if the app does not have a value-added element for the consumer. 

Apps should only be considered if adding the app improves customer experience. For example, specific customer account functions, like keeping track of rewards or payments, can be improved by an app. If all or most functions can be performed just as quickly on a mobile-site, adding an app is a waste of time and money.

Mobile-Ready = Flexibility

The principle behind mobile marketing best practices is flexibility. Email marketing may be replaced by text messaging as the primary means of business communication. Maybe one day people will be accessing websites mostly through their smart TVs, calling for a different kind of website responsiveness. If cellphone technology changes, bloat may no longer be a problem, making apps a more feasible option for companies. Keeping track of the technological environment is the only way to stay afloat in this modern age.

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